KPK on the CINEMA: (April 2017)

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> April was another busy movie month for me. I saw 23, mostly entertaining/occasionally stunning films made between 1920 and 2016, running the gamut from broad romantic comedy to serious documentary, from silent to musical, from the U.S. and countries around the globe, including Israel, Iran, Brazil, South Korea, Italy, Sweden and Australia. (Bear in mind: All films are rated on a 5 star basis and must be over a decade old to be awarded 5 stars, and dubbed a “classic”.)

> This month I review the following titles:

DESTINY  (1920) *****

SAND STORM  (2016) ****

FROM THE TERRACE  (1960) ***

TEACHER’S PET  (1958) ***+

CITY OF GOD: 10 YEARS LATER  (2012) **+

LITTLE MEN  (2016) ****

THE HOUSE ON TELEGRAPH HILL  (1951) ****

SCRABYLON  (2003) ***

GENTLEMAN’S AGREEMENT  (1947) ****+

DOCTOR STRANGE  (2016) ***

MORRIS FROM AMERICA  (2016) ***

GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES  (1953) *****

GROWING UP WILD  (2016) ****

THE WAILING  (2016) **

BARRY  (2016) ***+

THE CONFIRMATION  (2016) ***+

THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK  (1959) ****

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN  (1950) ****

NOW: IN THE WINGS ON A WORLD STAGE  (2014) ***+

FIRE AT SEA  (2016) ****

THE FINEST HOURS  (2016) ***+

SUMMER WITH MONIKA  (1953) ****

TANNA  (2016) ****+

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

DESTINY  (1920) *****

The singular Fritz Lang directed this silent meditation on the poetic question: “is love stronger than death?” When our heroine’s True Love is taken by an appropriately somber and mournful Death, she refuses to accept the finality of his touch. After much tearful entreaty in a room full of tall burning candles, Death is touched by her devotion and suffering. He is weary of taking the blame for following God’s orders, so pointing to three candles, he explains they represent three individuals whose time is nearly up and vows that if she can save even one of these lives, he will reunite the separated lovers. She is transported to different situations around the globe, where she is a lover, trying to save her man from the final hand of fate- all three souls played by the actor who plays her dead lover. She plots desperately to keep these men alive, but as he has since the dawn of man, Death always gets the final word. It is amazing to me that there are still so many classic silent films I’ve yet to see. Unfortunately, the great majority of them were lost to time, but what a vivid legacy remains, of those early days of cinema!

SAND STORM  (2016) ****

This Israeli Oscar submission is another very good film about arranged marriage. (I’ve seen several recently, including the excellent films IXCANUL and TANNA.) It’s the story of two women- mother and daughter Bedouins in the Negev Desert. Theirs is truly a man’s world. If a man wants to take a second wife, he takes a second wife. And that kind of thing can be a little tough on the first wife! That’s where this fine family drama begins. Winner of the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, this is writer-director Elite Zexer’s debut feature, and she is off to a great start! The second-class status of women around the world is one of the great shames of the human race. As Hillary Clinton so memorably said: “Women’s rights ARE human rights”.

FROM THE TERRACE  (1960) ***

In the mold of a Douglas Sirk weepie, this roiling, romantic drama was called a “women’s film” at the time because dealing with direct human emotion in a family setting was not considered “man stuff”. There are emotional fireworks in nearly every scene- sometimes effective, sometimes more than a little over-the-top. The thing I loved about it was watching real life partners Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward in their third cinematic pairing, as they fall in, and very much out of love onscreen. Their interplay is intense and authentic, smoldering with barely-submerged sexuality that is sometimes reminiscent of CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF. These two were so great together, onscreen and apparently off. Theirs was one of the great Hollywood romances of all time. And it’s a relationship that left a rich legacy.

TEACHER’S PET  (1958) ***+

Clark Gable and Doris Day star in this light comedy of the sexes, and it’s a fun romp. Gable is a hardboiled newspaperman who is invited by college journalism teacher Day to address her class, but being a self-made man with a dim view of formal education, he sends her a nasty letter declining the offer. Called on the carpet by his passive-aggressive editor, Gable is sent to apologize, but there is… an issue. Expecting a stodgy old lady, he finds a pert, lively cutie that immediately appeals to his libido. He decides to enroll in the class, undercover, in an attempt to woo her. Gable was getting a bit long in the tooth to play a romantic lead at this point, and he seemed no match for the beguiling Ms. Day who was contained and prim, while at the same time hinting at a raw, animal sexuality below surfaces. As I recall, this is what Doris Day did- play against her own type. This would explain why I had a childhood crush on her: she was both ‘wholesome’ and ‘sexy’, and despite her bland mainstream persona, she was insidiously good at it. Also good, was Gig Young, in a fine comic turn as the perceived ‘other man’, who seemed preternaturally perfect in every way, an unassailable rival for her affections. But he quickly becomes Gable’s ally, working behind the scenes to smooth the road for him. This formula film has more going for it than one would presume. Not classic- but real fun. And Doris Day was a babe!

CITY OF GOD: 10 YEARS LATER  (2012) **+

CITY OF GOD was one of the most amazing films of its kind that I have ever seen. A major cinematic triumph out of Brazil in 2002, it deservedly took the world by storm, making celebrities out of the troubled young thugs who essentially played themselves in the film about drugs and violence in the ramshackle favalas of Rio de Janeiro. But when the hoopla died down, and the premier at Sundance was well past, these young overnight stars had to return to a life that could never compare to the high society world they just experienced. Everyday reality was a let down, after the hyper success of the movie. Most of these young men struggled to go forward with their lives. It’s not like they were well compensated for their performances. Having no agents to negotiate for them, most actors received a pittance, necessitating a resumption of the everyday struggles they wrestled with before the film hit it big. (One actor even refused a percentage of the box office in favor of a cash payment that must have been the worst financial choice of his lifetime!) It’s a predictable story, really. I’ve seen it before in 2010’s WASTE LAND, a film about trash pickers in Rio involved in a big art project, making giant portraits out of the recyclables they collect. The experience was the same. To go from abject poverty into the public eye and then back again is a terribly hard journey. No one is ever fully prepared for it. The trouble with this film was its repetitiveness. The stories were essentially the same, so the film grew tiresome before it was over. I would imagine it resonated a lot more in Brazil, where they knew these people, and the world they had to return to after the dizzying heights of unlikely success.

LITTLE MEN  (2016) ****

This excellent, unassuming drama is a quiet wonder. Greg Kinnear is the patriarch of a family whose world is turned upside down by the death of his father. He’s a struggling actor, so his wife pays the bills from her income as a psychiatrist. They inherit a new home- but there are strings attached. There is a small shop in the building, run by a long time tenant and friend of the deceased man. She has been operating without a lease for decades, but things have changed. The new family needs the rent money, and a showdown is looming. Everything is complicated by the budding friendship between the landlord’s son and the tenant’s boy. What will happen to them if the parents become adversaries in a legal battle? This is a very well written, well-acted rumination on the insidious effects of gentrification on both the owners and the leaseholders. It’s a conflict that is usually presented in a moral black & white, with the real estate class playing the villains. Everything is a lot more three-dimensional here, and the ending is pleasantly unmanipulative. I have not enjoyed most of this director’s previous work- KEEP THE LIGHTS ON and FORTY SHADES OF BLUE absolutely did not work for me. But LOVE IS STRANGE was sweet, and if this achievement portends anything, Ira Sachs might have some very good work ahead.

THE HOUSE ON TELEGRAPH HILL  (1951) ****

Solid noir drama about a Polish woman facing oblivion after life in a WWII P.O.W. camp, who steals her best friend’s identity in an attempt to salvage what remains of her life. She ends up in a creepy old house on top of San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill playing surrogate mother to her friend’s orphaned boy and wife to her widowed husband, played by the reliable Richard Basehart at his slimiest. Is this widower and new suitor not the man he appears? Robert Wise (THE SOUND OF MUSIC) directed this murder thriller and it works its way to a satisfying ending.

SCRABYLON  (2003) ***

This is a fairly basic look at the top echelons of competitive Scrabble, more absorbingly detailed in the Stefan Fatsis book Word Freak. Stephen himself appears here, as do all the bigshot Scrabble celebrities of the era from “Mr. Scrabble” Joe Edley to G.I. (gastro-intestinal) Joel, infamous for passing foul gas during play. A mere one year later the documentary WORD WARS covered the same ground much more thoroughly.

GENTLEMAN’S AGREEMENT  (1947) ****+

Elia Kazan’s take on lingering anti-Semitism in the U.S. rattled a lot of cages when it was released. It seems to pull its punches by today’s standards. Playing another in a long line of highly moral men, Gregory Peck is an investigative reporter given the difficult assignment to find a new angle on an old story. He struggles with it, until he hits upon the idea of posing as a Jew himself, to get first hand experience of the problem. And waddaya know- anti-Semitism does prove to be pervasive and insidious. This charade tests all his relationships, including his romance with Dorothy McGuire who was raised with a (liberal) silver spoon in her mouth. The fine cast includes John Garfield, Celeste Holm, Jane Wyatt, Dean Stockwell and Sam Jaffe. This “statement” film stands the test of time because racism and anti-Semitism stubbornly persists. It also has something to say between the lines about political correctness in America that still smarts today.

DOCTOR STRANGE  (2016) ***

Ho hum. Much ado about… very little. This origin story was barely there. Even the great Benedict Cumberbatch in the lead failed to create much interest in the new Marvel franchise. Tilda Swinden is a cliché as the eternal being who opens the doctor’s eyes to the mystical arts. We get some nice eye candy, but nowhere near the amount this material suggests. Without having to abide by the laws of physics, anything becomes possible, yet not much is attempted. The best effects involve the enigmatic mystical Master who steals power from the equivalent of Star wars’ dark side, to fuel her eternal struggle. She bends, folds and manipulates reality the way we have already seen in INCEPTION and lesser films that followed. It feels like a rehash. Let’s hope the storytellers at Marvel Studios do a better job of filling out the character and his world in future installments.

MORRIS FROM AMERICA  (2016) ***

Morris is a fish out of water. Not a lot of black folks live in Germany- but that’s where his widowed dad coaches soccer, so that’s where 13 year old Morris lives, even if he can’t speak much German and doesn’t see a place for an aspiring rapper in his culturally insular school. His tutor is Carla Juri, so memorable in WETLANDS. It’s a sweet, simple coming-of-age story. Not much to it really, but a pleasure to watch.

GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES   (1953) *****

And according to this classic musical, blondes prefer diamonds. This is a tale of two women seeking love, but using very different criteria. Lorelei, (a fetching Monroe, occasionally trying too hard), seeks a man with money above all else and her pal Dorothy, (played by an earthy and slyly wicked Jane Russell), just wants to love and be loved. Taken from a 1949 stage musical helmed by Carol Channing, there aren’t many musical numbers really- and Ms. Russell had an uninspired song that dragged the film down a bit, but the final title song is dazzling. A winsome Monroe is stunning in a white sequined dress against a deep red background crooning “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend”, which plays like a gay fantasia now. It is simply one of the best musical numbers ever committed to film. It’s all pretty silly really, but what a lot of fun!

GROWING UP WILD  (2016) ****

Disney Nature is becoming synonymous with “pretty but vapid”. Here, we revisit territory already covered in AFRICAN CATS, CHIMPANZEE, BEARS and MONKEY KINGDOM, but with a focus on baby animals learning the skills necessary to survive in the wild. Daveed Diggs, (ZOOTOPIA on film, and Hamilton on Broadway), provided the voiceover so poorly that I kept noticing that he was perhaps the worst choice I have ever heard for a narrator, lacking joy, verve or humor. Times are changing in the industry, apparently- getting worse by the film as they attempt to reach modern audiences with a very old formula. Lovely to look at, of course, but give me BEAR COUNTRY and BEAVER VALLEY any day over this warmed-over mush.

THE WAILING  (2016) **

I don’t know what it is with me and Korean films… Aside from the spectacular OLDBOY, they don’t seem to do much for me. Like Indian films, they seem to routinely venture way over the top. I am not much of a horror fan, but I do like effective supernatural thrillers and stories involving shamanism. Nonetheless, THE WAILING was more of a chore than a joy to me. It was too long, and had too many hysterics and unanswered questions to be a satisfying film.

BARRY  (2016) ***+

This is the second biopic I’ve seen about the early life of Barack Hussein Obama… so far. These films lay the groundwork, but I would imagine there are more great stories to tell about this inspiring but divisive leader. I saw the two films in reverse-chronological order, as SOUTHSIDE WITH YOU covers a period after BARRY, which focuses on his college years at Columbia University in the Big Apple. Indonesia and Hawaii now behind him, Barak, (“Barry” at the time), was a man of great promise and potential trying to decide what to do with his life. More than anything else, this film is about a man attempting to come to grips with his biracial identity in a world that prefers that he belong to one group or the other. Barry has a burgeoning romance with Charlotte, a white woman- and people stare at them disapprovingly in the streets of black and white neighborhoods alike. He aches for his absent father, and receives an unexpected visit from his mother, Ashley Judd in a cameo. We see him struggle to come to grips with his background, confronting thorny, unexpected issues at every turn. He gets racially profiled by a white security guard and threatened with violence by a black neighbor, who is rubbed the wrong way by his “white” attitude. And his relationship with Charlotte? We know that didn’t stand the strain. (Good thing, or we never would have gotten the delightful SOUTHSIDE WITH YOU about his first date with Michelle Robinson, destined to be the true love of his life and First Lady of the United States.) For the most part, the dialogue is sparkling and incisive, and very well written. One exception might be a transparently convenient scene, where his friend P.J. gives him a tour of life in Harlem’s projects, in effect introducing young Barry to his black side, and the tragic fact that life in America is very different on the other side of the color barrier. Cigarette always in hand, actor Devin Terrell just nails the internalized dichotomy of the icon: a man who looks black to a world that only gazes skin deep, but feels colorless inside, from his upbringing in a white family. White folks saw his black ski,n and black folks thought he was too elitist, a euphemism for “white”. Strange then, that Obama seemed so blindsided by the depth and virulence of America’s racism, when he became president. Sadly, he could never make large swathes of the nation see the colorless man beneath his skin.

THE CONFIRMATION  (2016) ***+

I can confirm that this is one very worthwhile and entertaining film. This title came to my attention when the MSN news site posted a list called: “Best Films of 2016 That You Have Not Seen”. What a resource that turned out to be! A great many of these movies turned out to be available on Netflix, and for the most part, they were the best underappreciated films of the year that was. A few scenes into this family drama disguised as a comedy, and it becomes clear that Clive Owen is going to give another truly wonderful performance. It’s what he does, ever since GOSFORD PARK. Owen is wonderful to watch as a man attempting to choose fatherhood over alcoholism. The action takes place over a single hapless weekend. Against mom’s better judgment, dad has custody of their young son, while she and her new husband are away- and for good reason! As soon as they are alone the trials begin. Dad takes the boy straight to a bar- not to drink, as it turns out, but in search of carpentry work. While there, his crucial specialized toolkit is stolen. Then he gets evicted. Together, father and son go on a series of misadventures, attempting to track down the stolen tools. The kid at the center of the story needed to be just perfect- and he was. He perfectly embodied that bright, observant child whose knowledge far exceeds his understanding. (When the priest in the confessional asks him if he had any “impure thoughts”, he wonders aloud what those thoughts would look like.) Naomi Watts doesn’t have much to do as the fretting mom, but Matthew Modine fares much better as the boys’ emasculated stepdad, trying much too hard to be tolerant and “enlightened”. Modine’s performance is quietly savage. The central question: the child is being indoctrinated into the Catholic Church, but he really doesn’t know what to think. Should he honor his mother’s wishes and take communion to be “confirmed” or follow his own inner voice? The teachings of the church often seem to interfere with his father’s efforts- as when the child impulsively gives every penny they have to charity because the church teaches him to “be charitable”. The Real Life lessons he learns from his weekend with dad make him question his path. It doesn’t help when his father gives him the (very good) advice to get all the information he can then listen to his own inner drummer and decide what’s best for him. When his eventful weekend with dad is over the boy will have to decide: does he do what feels right for him, or sublimate himself to please his mother?

THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK  (1959) ****

This is big, bombastic filmmaking from George Stevens- a director who paints in broad Hollywood strokes, (SHANE, GIANT, SWING TIME, to name a few). It’s long at almost 3 hours, has an overture before the feature, an intermission in the middle, and underture at the end, features a stirringly dramatic score by Alfred Newman and contains flashy melodramatic performances from the likes of Shelly Winters, (who won Best Supporting Actress for the effort), and Ed Wynn, playing the least likable man I’ve ever seen him portray. (Guess I’ll always see him in my mind’s eye floating to the ceiling with laughter in MARY POPPINS.) I was familiar with the play THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK from my earliest days studying acting, but somehow, I never got around to the film, now generally considered to be a classic despite the fact that it initially bombed at the box office. It’s a true story from history, culled from the diary of a 12 year old girl found when the allies liberated Amsterdam, telling the desperate, ultimately tragic story of a small group of Jews, secretly harbored from the Nazis in a tiny, cramped loft above a factory. They lived in tight isolation for two long years before their discovery and tragic fate in German concentration camps. This is an appropriately claustrophobic film, shot in the actual loft the persecuted group hid in. (I can’t imagine this ever being allowed now!) It is a product of its time, so everything is more than a bit over-the-top by today’s standards, but it keeps your attention throughout. Such big Hollywood filmmaking often feels at odds with the material, as though it were at the same time honoring their memory and exploiting their story. With so much innate drama, it wasn’t necessary to have so much bombast, and overwrought emotional histrionics- most of it courtesy Shelly Winters and Millie Perkins, the too perky, overeager actress who played, (or perhaps overplayed), young Anne. Every moment Ms. Perkins held the camera was too precious by half. For one thing, her voice was tightly controlled and painfully earnest, with little subtext at all. Vocally and physically, she reminded me of a young Jean Simmons, minus the talent. All this heat was the style of the time, I reckon. Audiences demand more emotional veracity now. The character of Anne herself felt two-dimensional- more of an archetype than a red-blooded person. I hear the actual diary presents a much more complex picture of a pubescent girl roiled by the usual coming-of-age turmoil, In it, she is less of a heroine and more of an ordinary girl trapped in extraordinary circumstances. The hiding place they used is Amsterdam’s number one tourist trap. I hear it is that rarity: a tourist mecca actually worth the visit. After nearly three hours looking at it, I feel as though I’ve actually been there. My takeaway from this film: What at total, catastrophic tragedy! Years in hiding only to be exposed and captured after D-Day but before liberation! And with the rising tide of nationalism in the world, one has to wonder if the painful lessons of WWII will be remembered, or if history is doomed to repeat itself.

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN  (1950) ****

This was another story I became familiar with via junior high dramatics, though I had never seen the film. It’s a “father knows best” kind of movie that plays as a love letter to an eccentric, (and apparently very fertile!), efficiency expert who treats his family as one big social experiment. Clifton Webb and Myrna Loy are both very comfortable in their roles, as a remarkable couple that decided to have an even dozen offspring, then proceeded to do just that. Entirely character-driven and family-friendly, there aren’t enough films like this made today. This property is all gentle sweetness, until the bittersweet sentiment of the end. An American story, this near-classic is little corny, and a lot charming.

NOW: IN THE WINGS ON A WORLD STAGE  (2014) ***+

Films like NOW are tailor-made for me. My heart is, and has always been in the theatre, even if my body hasn’t been there for years. It would be almost impossible for me to dislike a film about life in the theatre because I love the lifestyle so passionately. Kevin Spacey took a yearlong sabbatical from Hollywood and co-created what he called the first transcontinental theatre company to mount a touring production of Shakespeare’s Richard III, featuring Spacey in the juicy titular role. While NOW reminded me of how much I miss my life in the theatre, it also reminded me of why I stopped doing it. Acting, particularly for the stage, is among the most insecure of professions. At any given time 90-something percent of union actors are unemployed. One never knows when- or if their next role is coming. The flip side of it is the incredible camaraderie and sense of group accomplishment. Plays are distinct entities, happening in real time then (generally) gone forever. A movie will play exactly the same way every time, but no two performances of a live play are identical. It’s a collective endeavor in a world that puts a premium on individuality. For a limited set time, a group of people work together in different capacities to achieve the same goal. Everyone has an important role to play, whether they are actors on the boards or technicians in the wings. In the process, you can’t help but form a kind of temporary family. You can certainly see that here, in the way the actor’s eyes tear up when talking about their company. It can lead to lifelong friendships and more, but it can also engender an almost inevitable sadness that comes at the end of the run, when you are suddenly torn away from the fellows you have come to treasure, to face an uncertain future. While this might not be an absolutely great film about theatre, if you love the plays attributed to Shakespeare as I do, you do get the pleasure of seeing Kevin Spacey go to town on the role of evil scheming hunchback King Richard. He is just having a ball, and it looks like he was awfully good- a malevolent force of nature! And all this, directed by Sam Mendes (AMERICAN BEAUTY, THE ROAD TO PERDITION), who certainly seems to know what he’s doing onstage as well as he does onscreen. There’s a lot to recommend this, whether you are a “theatre person” or not. It would make a great introduction to the theatre world, and to why Shakespeare still matters.

FIRE AT SEA  (2016) ****

Slow, but involving cinéma vérité documentary about life on the Italian island of Lampedusa. The locals live an ancient way of life, taking their bounty from the sea, but they are now on the front lines of the Mediterranean migrant crisis. Director Gianfranco Rosi lived with the locals for several months, gathering insight into the island people and how the sudden inflow of thousands of desperate refugees from Africa and Eastern Europe has affected their world. On the one hand we have young Samuele who is learning the ways of the fisherman while prowling the island shooting birds with his slingshot. On the other, we have boatload after boatload of forced migrants arriving in wave after wave in flimsy, and often leaky or sinking boats. They are seriously overloaded, and jammed with traumatized people at the lowest ebb of their lives. In the hull, are often the bodies of those asphyxiated by fumes and poisoned by petrol burns. It’s a horrible tragedy, but the islanders have their challenges too. Samuele has a “lazy eye” that impacts his slingshot prowess and threatens his future livelihood. In sum, this quietly powerful film becomes so much more than you expect.

THE FINEST HOURS  (2016) ***+

This Disney reenactment of a legendary rescue at sea succeeds in being thrilling when it needs to be, but fails at establishing complex characters. In a film like this, that doesn’t matter much- as long as the actors are likable and sympathetic- and they are. Casey Affleck doesn’t have much to do but brood, and star Chris Pine seems to be trying to completely disappear into the character of an ordinary man called upon to do the extraordinary. Some stunning effects here, that are not just bells and whistles, but central to the suspense and storytelling. Man vs. nature is one of my favorite scenarios, and it’s really at play here! Not great, but pretty damn entertaining.

SUMMER WITH MONIKA  (1953) ****

I’m sure I saw this Bergman gem in my early 20’s when I became obsessed with the magnificent Swedish director, making countless pilgrimages to art house cinemas to see every film he ever shot. I certainly didn’t realize at the time how very, very accomplished it is. Notorious at the time for its casual nudity, it seems much ado about nothing now, as the nude scenes are entirely naturalistic, non-exploitive and appropriate. It’s the love story of Harry and Monika- two young people trapped in dreary, mundane jobs in Stockholm. When trouble brews for Monika, the two take a boat and escape to an island for a sensual summer of love on the lam. It all comes crashing down when Monika gets pregnant, and they are forced to return. But impulsive, adventurous Monika, (a sultry and physical Harriet Anderson- Bergman’s love interest at the time), was born to play- not for the drudgery of parenthood. Harry rises to the challenge, buckling down into a serious job- but Monika does not have it in her, and her self-centeredness and refusal to grow into motherhood doom the relationship. Really excellent work. Bergman was one hell of a filmmaker.

TANNA  (2016) ****+

Australia’s Best Foreign Language Oscar contender was a true stunner! TANNA had to be among the top 100 most beautiful films I’ve ever watched. It’s my third recent film about arranged marriage- an interesting coincidence and a fraught subject: progress confronted by tradition. The unique angle about this film: shot on location in lush, tropical Vanuatu, it’s a reenactment of a doomed romance that actually happened in 1987 on the volcanic island of Tanna in the South Pacific, as recreated by the people of the Yakel tribe. The tribal actors aren’t polished or trained, but their authenticity shines through. The leads were very appealing as young lovers, thwarted by a marriage arranged to avert war with a neighboring tribe. I saw the end coming long before it came, but hey- there are only something like nine plotlines, in all their splendid variants, and the “Romeo and Juliet” plot does not end in a happily-ever-after. Still, this naturalistic wonder is not a bummer to watch. (But then, neither is a good production of Romeo and Juliet…) It’s a tragic tale that succeeds in uplifting, when the two tribes manage against all odds, to wring some meaning out of the tragedy. Four-and-a-half stars says it all!

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> Well… That was an eclectic group. Until next month around this time: Vive Cine!

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© Kevin Paul Keelan and lastcre8iveiconoclast, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kevin Paul Keelan and lastcre8iveiconoclast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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About KPKeelan

Fool, Philosopher, Lover & Dreamer, Benign TROUBLEMAKER, King and Jester of KPKworld, an online portal to visual and linguistic mystery, befuddlement and delight.
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